What are some causes of hyperventilation?

What are some causes of hyperventilation?

Classmate Question #2

Hyperventilation, or over breathing is when you inhale much deeper and take much faster breaths than normal. This deep, quick breathing changes the gas exchange in your lungs. Usually when you breathe oxygen goes in and carbon dioxide goes out. But when you hyperventilate you breathe out more carbon dioxide than usual so that levels in your bloodstream drop. When you’re over breathing, you might not be aware you’re breathing fast and deep and might have other symptoms as well like lightheaded or dizzy, feeling as if you can’t catch your breath, and chest pain.  This usually happens when you are nervous, anxious, or stressed or having a panic attach, infection or child birth. Women hyperventilate more often than men do.  Some ways to help with hyperventilation is breathing slowly in a brown paper bag, breathe through pursed lips, breathe with your belly instead of your chest and hold your breath for 10 to 15 seconds at a time. When you’re over breathing, you might not be aware you’re breathing fast and deep and might have other symptoms as well like lightheaded or dizzy, feeling as if you can’t catch your breath, and chest pain.

What are some causes of hyperventilation?

References

Fields, L. (n.d.). Hyperventilation: Symptoms, causes, treatment, emergencies. WebMD. Retrieved May 26, 2022, from https://www.webmd.com/lung/lung-hyperventilation-what-to-do

Hyperventilation. Johns Hopkins Medicine. (2019, November 19). Retrieved May 26, 2022, from https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/hyperventilation (Links to an external site.)

Team, T. H. E. (2019, April 29). What causes hyperventilation? Healthline. Retrieved May 26, 2022, from https://www.healthline.com/health/hyperventilation

Classmate Question #2:

Everybody depending on their age, sex, or body condition has a different pulmonary volume and capacity (National Cancer Institute, n.d.-b). The regular respiration rate for an adult is 12 to 15 breaths per minute. That breath means a full respiratory cycle which includes inhaling and exhaling. The measurement of air in our lungs can be divided into 4 different volumes and 4 different capacities (Get Body Smart, 2020). Lung volumes are measured by tidal volume, inspiratory reserve volume, expiratory reserve volume, and residual volume. Lung capacities are measured by inspiratory capacity, functional reserve capacity, vital capacity, and total lung capacity. Tidal volume is the measurement of air being inhaled and exhaled with a normal breath (Lung Volumes and Capacities, 2020). Inspiratory reserve volume is the measurement of extra air that can potentially be inhaled after a regular breath. Expiratory reserve volume is the measurement of extra air that can be exhaled after a normal exhale. Residual volume is a measurement of what air is left after the expiratory reserve volume is measured because lungs are never completely empty. Inspiratory capacity is the number you get after you add tidal volume and inspiratory reserve volume together. Functional reserve capacity is expiratory reserve volume and residual volume. Vital capacity is the maximum amount of air in a cycle so this is expiratory reserve volume plus tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume. Total lung capacity is how much air that lung can hold so it is the number after you have added all four lung volumes together. Who is more at risk for spontaneous pneumothorax and why?

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References:

Get Body Smart. (2020, April 15). Lung Volumes and Capacities. GetBodySmart. Retrieved May 25, 2022, from https://www.getbodysmart.com/spirometry/lung-volumes-capacities

Lung Volumes and Capacities. (2020, August 15). https://bio.libretexts.org/@go/page/14026

National Cancer Institute. (n.d.-b). Respiratory Volumes and Capacities | SEER Training. Retrieved May 25, 2022, from https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/respiratory/capacity.html